Science

by Mary Fitz on May 9, 2013

In recent blogs, I mentioned using curriculum as the content for communication therapy (Greek Myths for Speech Therapy and Language Therapy Techniques for Articulation.) In this blog, I wanted to share the benefit of using Science books.

Science books are wonderful resources because they frequently have visual presentations that are displayed sequentially. Often, there are experiments for the kinesthetic and visual learner. And, again, by following the process of the experiment, sequencing is essential for the experiment to work correctly.

A wonderful Science book that I use is called Look Inside Science.

I use this book for kindergarten to 2nd grade students. The pictures are colorful. Each page of the book addresses a particular science topic and the bonus is that it has may “lift the flaps” to add interest. Some of the flaps have more flaps underneath.

This book sparks interest in my students. I encourage curiosity because a curious student is a forever learner.

After we read a page in the book, I asked my students to write a story based on my Who, What, When, Where, Why chart.

The following story was written by a kindergarten student. On his first attempt to tell me about how the fulcrum worked in our experiment, he was not intelligible. None of his sentences explained a complete idea. However, when we wrote notes on the Who, What, When, Where, Why chart, he was able to include the significant ideas and organize his thoughts so that he could dictate his story.

Science books are visual. Experiments provide opportunities for the kinesthetic and visual learners to gain information. And, again, by following the process of the experiment, sequencing is essential for the experiment to work correctly. Being able to describe science through communication skills is fun and interesting and there are many opportunities for learning.

Happy Talking!

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